Tag Archives: Summer

The Power of Camp

“You’re sending Sophia to camp for TWO WEEKS?”

Shock is a common response parents get when discussing sending their child to sleep-away camp. family-1083They often face criticism for allowing their young child out from under their direct supervision. In this over-involved parenting age, the thought of allowing an eight year old to go away to camp for two weeks is incomprehensible to many parents. What “non-camp” parents don’t understand is that allowing your child to have a camp experience is a gift that has positive, life-long benefits beyond learning how to sail or rock climb. Camp parents aren’t bad parents who “send their children away.” They are parents who see the value in letting their children have an experience that enriches their childhood.

Parents who went to traditional summer camps as children themselves are more likely to send their children to camp compared to other parents. Many of these parents still keep in touch with camp friends and worked as camp counselors during college. They understand the life-long benefits they gained from their camp experiences and want the same thing for their kids. Experienced camp parents need not read further. This article is for parents who want to know why many families choose to send their children to sleep away camp.

faq-3509

 

A Taste of Independence

family-3056Being super-involved with our children and always being in constant communication with them has become something modern parents brag about. But when do we start letting go and giving our kids a chance to feel independent from us? With cell phones attached at our (and their) hips, our children are in constant communication with us. Forgot their lunch? A friend says something mean? Stubbed their toe? We know right away and swoop in to rescue them.

Intuitively, we know that it’s better to let our kids deal with consequences from their mistakes, face some problems on their own, and get through the day without us, but it’s SO HARD to let them. We feel fortunate to have a close relationship with our child and we don’t want to jeopardize that relationship by turning off our phone or saying “no.” It’s difficult to let them face a problem or bad day at school on their own. Unfortunately, we are setting our kids up for much more difficulty later in life if we don’t start letting them have some independence when they are younger.
Camp experiences at younger ages may help children adjust to later independent experiences, including college. A Stanford Magazine (May/June, 2009) article called “Students on the Edge” published results of research on the psychological health of current University students:
“Unlike previous generations, young people often speak with their parents several times a day. And while family closeness is usually a positive force, it can come with a downside. Administrators at Stanford and elsewhere describe a level of parental involvement that often limits choices and has altered the cultural norms of college life. That includes parents who insist on choosing their child’s area of study and then show up to negotiate his or her salary after graduation.”

Sleep away camps, especially those that do not allow cell phones and phone calls, offer a great opportunity for kids to develop independence in a supportive, safe setting away from their parents. Some parents today think that it’s a comforting thought that their child may end up living with them, or at least calling every day, well into adulthood. Most of us know, however, that when you truly love your children and want the best for them, you need to give them more freedom, responsibilities, and independence as they grow through their different stages of childhood and into adulthood.

These words of a first-time sleep away camp parent are especially poignant:

“My shy, quiet nine year old went to camp not knowing a soul. Two weeks later, my daughter came home transformed. She blossomed, she made friends, learned a multitude of activities, felt safe, loved, confident, and happy, really happy. As hard as it was on me, it was all worth it for her. I know this is the single best thing I have ever done for her.” – 2014 Camp Parent

First-time camp experiences are much harder on parents than they are on kids. The relief parents feel when they see their child after a camp stay is palpable, and the amazement at their child’s growth is an equally strong emotion. The independence kids experience at camp can open their eyes to many new dreams and opportunities, and may lead to them feeling more confident about pursuing schools, travels, and adventures further from home. Although it’s hard to let kids go, the words of singer Mark Harris sum up what most parents dream of for their children:
“It’s not living if you don’t reach for the sky. I’ll have tears as you take off, but I’ll cheer you as you fly.”

faq-8373

Creating Connections: Making Friends at Camp and Beyond

Our goals at Gold Arrow Camp are articulated, posted, recited, and practiced by our campers and staff each summer.  The goals are to have fun, make friends, and grow.

Each summer, we also select a theme to help campers and staff focus on a specific skill or character trait that will contribute to their fun, friendships, and growth. We want our campers to develop life skills at camp that benefit them long after their camp days are over. In 2012, we focused on practicing gratitude. In 2013, kindness was our focus. Our 2014 summer theme was Creating Connections, and we focused on friendships.  This summer, our theme is Give A Hand, and we’re excited to focus on reaching out and helping others.

Friendships have always been a big part of what makes campers and staff love GAC and return year after year, so last summer we focused on one of the best aspects of camp – Creating Connections! We focused on making solid friendship connections at camp, learning and practicing social skills that make us good friends, and maintaining friendships after camp ends.

Positive relationships predict happiness better than health, economic status, education level, and other aspects of life. Yet there is no class offered in school on how to make and keep friends, and while the skill comes naturally to some, to others creating connections is not easy.  That’s where GAC comes in. Camp is all about friends, because camp is a time when kids have the opportunity to really connect, face-to-face and without distractions, with other kids and young adults. Around the campfire, out on a sailboat, enjoying the sunset together during an evening canoe, and many other camp moments every day provide campers with the opportunity to really connect – without distractions, without worrying about the social strata, without feeling rushed because there’s a sports practice or meeting to get to. Campers’ time together at camp is much more concentrated and focused than time spent with friends in between school and organized, structured sports and activities. Circled around a campfire, sharing their goals, fears, and dreams, campers get to know each other well, learn to appreciate each other’s unique qualities, and form deep bonds of friendship. In fact, many campers say their camp friends, whom they spend only two weeks with each summer, are their closest friends. This summer, we’re going to focus on those friendships.

Making Friends

From the moment campers step on the bus to go to camp, counselors will facilitate introductions between campers. By the end of the first day at camp, campers will not only know the names of everyone in their cabin group, but they will also know some of the goals and personality characteristics that make their new friends tick. Counselors will help campers get to know each other through both organized and informal social games and activities. Throughout the camp session, campers will have opportunities for both group and one-on-one socializing with other campers, facilitated by counselors as needed.

Learning & Practicing Friendship Skills

Counselors will coach campers on specific social skills that help form and maintain solid friendships, including the communication skills, emotion regulation skills, and emotional intelligence that are important in forming positive relationships with others.

Counselors will model the social skills they want campers to practice and will facilitate age-appropriate campfire discussions about friendship. Campers will be asked to look for and point out ways their cabin mates have demonstrated great friendship traits. Through different activities facilitated by the counselors, campers will talk about and share how they’re creating connections at camp.

Counselors will talk with campers about how each person needs to develop relationship skills to help connect better with others, and counselors will help campers tune it to their friendship strengths and coach them in areas where they can improve their friendship skills.

Maintaining Camp Friendships

At the conclusion of the session, we will encourage campers to stay in touch with each other after camp ends. We’ll have them exchange email, phone, address, or social media account information (whichever is their best form of contact). Rather than sending the cabin address list to parents as we have done in the past, we will ask campers to take ownership of this exchange of friend contact information.  Ask your camper to show you his “Friendship Contact Information” when he gets home from camp, and encourage him to keep up the connections he creates at GAC this summer!

Our goal is for all of our campers to create solid friendship connections with their cabin mates and other campers that are maintained well beyond the borders of GAC and that last much longer than their camp session.

We had a great 2014 summer Creating Connections, and we’re looking forward to continuing that this summer!

Friendship-9866

Audrey “Sunshine” Monke has been the owner and director of Gold Arrow Camp since 1989.  Read more of her thoughts on camp and parenting at sunshine-parenting.com.

3 Ways to Make Family Dinner like a Campfire

3 Ways To Make Family Dinner like a CampfireMost of us know the importance of family dinners:

Kids who regularly eat dinner with their families are more emotionally stable, are less likely to abuse drugs and alcohol, get better grades, have fewer depressive symptoms, and are less inclined to obesity or eating disorders.

It’s certainly a compelling list. But what can you do if your family dinner isn’t that great? If people just “eat and run” or don’t really connect? One answer might be turning your dinner table into a campfire pit. Not literally, of course, but group campfires at summer camp offer a great example of fun, engaging activities that have helped make dinners at our house last longer than the ten minutes it takes my boys to shovel down their food.

Here are some ideas:

 

Sharing highs, lows, and “gratitudes” (I know that’s not a real word, but that’s what we use)

GAC CampfireOne way we’ve found to get everyone talking and contributing at our dinner table is consistent sharing time. We find out what’s going on in our kids’ lives (and in the lives of unsuspecting visiting friends) and we as parents share what’s going on in ours. For children who are quieter and generally don’t “take the floor” as often, this consistent discussion helps them open up.   And for those who don’t naturally focus on the good things, it helps them see the positive in their day.

Around the campfire, it’s an activity called “High & Lows,” or—as it’s now evolved in our family—“Highs, Lows, and Gratitudes.” It’s very simple:  Each person has a turn (uninterrupted, with everyone focused on that one person) to share
•  their HIGH point of the day,
•  their LOW point of the day, and
•  their GRATITUDE—what they’re feeling grateful for.

For a twist, we sometimes make rules for sharing: a “high” might be limited to three words, or a “low” might have a one word limit.  It creates a fun challenge and makes us think. If we can’t come up with a low, we share another high.

Sometimes, we interrupt, tell long stories, or go off on tangents, but that’s okay.  We’re connecting, sharing, and discovering what’s happening in each other’s lives. Our dinners last much longer than ten minutes, and our kids know they won’t be excused until everyone shares.

In The Whole-Brain Child, Daniel Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson write about the importance of getting kids to remember their stories.  So, instead of asking “How was your day?” which invariably gets a one-word response, they recommend asking “What was the best part of your day?” and “What was your not-the-best part?”  Sounds like a high and low of the day to me!GAC Campfire

Question or topic of the night

There are so many fun books and table games available, but you can probably just take turns thinking up a fun question for each person to answer, much like counselors do around a campfire. For my birthday a few weeks ago, a friend who knows me well gave me Q & A a day for Kids by Betsy Franco, which has 365 questions (one for each day) to discuss with your kids. We also have used The Enchanted Table (by Memorable Mealtimes) and Table Topics, a box of questions that our kids like taking turns reading.

Family Meeting (once per week)

health-78At camp, we always start the session with what we call our “First Night Campfire.” The counselor has a specific agenda for the campfire, which includes all the kids getting to know each other, sharing a goal they have for camp, and what guidelines they want to live by during their two-week stay. Families need to do the same kind of checking in with one other, so—once a week—we have a “Family Meeting” during dinner. We have an agenda that’s on a legal pad next to the table, and we take turns being the “chair” of the meeting.

On our agenda:
• What’s going on this week? We talk about the schedule for the coming week (any big projects/assignments due, any events, parents going anywhere)
• Goal for the week: Each person shares a goal for the week (something we want to get done, do better, etc.)
• A value or social skill we want to talk about. These have been focused on social skills for the past year in our house, and we’ve talked about things like looking someone in the eye while meeting them and how to chat with an adult. We’ve also used this printable (“10 Social Manners for Kids” from iMom) for several topics. Lately, it’s been a contest to see who can remember all ten!

We’ll hold fast to our family dinner time as long as we have kids in the house; I know it will be over far too soon. In the whirl of the last four years, our family group of seven has dwindled to the “final four”: me, my husband, and our two youngest. The meals we share are nothing like June Cleaver’s pot roast, and they often involve my awesome husband cooking or picking up something easy to eat or make. It’s rarely a big production, but it’s still really big. When we are gathered around our table eating and talking—with no phones or tablets in sight—it doesn’t matter if we have a home-cooked meal or a Panda bowl; as long as we’re connecting and sharing, it’s the biggest and best part—it’s our HIGH  point—of the day.

All we’re missing is the campfire.

Originally posted on Sunshine Parenting. If you like Sunshine Parenting, please subscribe to get an email update each time I post (use box on upper right column), or follow me on Facebook or Pinterest for links to other articles and ideas about camp and parenting. Thank you for reading!

Resources/Related:

Why Family Dinner is Important (Sunshine Parenting)
Sharing our Highs, Lows, and Buffalos (Sunshine Parenting)
Get 10 Social Manners for Kids Free Printable (iMom)
Resources for Teaching Social Skills

Ten Most Memorable Moments of GAC 2014

1. New Programs!

This summer, GAC added FOUR new programs: Log Rolling, Hammock Hangout, GACting, and Ice Cream Making.

 

2. Big Campfire – Bigger and Better Than Ever!

Edit

Big Campfire featured new seating, a sound booth, and a staging area behind the stage. Campers now have the opportunity to prepare for skits backstage!

 

3. Appreciation Campfire Highlight Videos

At the end of each Appreciation Campfire, before counselors lit candles and we all sang “The Circle Game,” we watched a video of session highlights produced by Curly, our videographer. There were even guest vocals by counselors.

 

4. Campers Conquered Fears

Grow

At the end of the summer, this banner was filled with stories and signatures of campers who conquered their fear of sailing!

 

5. Koo Koo Kanga Roo

Many times during the summer, campers and staff would drop everything to pick up our feet and stomp them to a Koo Koo Kanga Roo hit.

 

6. ChiLala Got Married (Again!)

ChiLala Wedding

Veteran GAC counselors, Chilli and Lala (ChiLala), got married in Maryland in May, 2014. They returned to their GAC home for a week this summer. While at camp, they finally had a proper GAC wedding, including a paper tie made in Arts and Crafts and a bubble arch from campers as they entered their reception, a Wedding Banquet on the Dining Porch, with all Session #3 campers and counselors invited!

 

7. Outdoor Leadership Course

In its sophomore year, the OLC took older campers on a challenging seven day, 30+ mile backpacking trip that included a High Sierra crossing of the John Muir Wilderness.

 

8. We Danced…. A Lot!

June Sports DanceSession 1 Animal DanceSession 2 Neon Dance Session 3 Superhero DanceSession 4 Historical Figure DanceAugust Western Dance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2014 Dance Themes were a hit this summer!

  • June Water Sports Specialty Camp: Sports
  • Session 1: Animal
  • Session 2: Neon
  • Session 3: Superhero
  • Session 4: Historical Figure
  • August Shaver Water Sports and Mini Camp: Western

9. Shaver Island

Shaver Island, GAC’s outpost island on Shaver Lake, continued to be a highlight for many campers. Campers visit the island for 1-2 nights during a two-week session, sleeping on the beach under the stars each night, and focusing on waterskiing, wakeboarding, and kneeboarding, riding on competition-style ski boats. Oh, and s’mores, camp songs and games around a campfire circle were included each night!

 

10. We HAD FUN, MADE FRIENDS, AND GREW!

Is there any other way to spend a summer?

 

Thanks to all our amazing campers and counselors who joined us in 2014!

See you next summer!

Campers talk about GAC

GACspiration_CC_Amanda We just ended another fantastic Sierra summer, and we’re already counting down the days until Summer 2015! While at camp, we asked a few of our five-year campers what made GAC great.

Vimeography error: The Vimeography theme you are trying to use is not installed or activated.

Ruth, a five-year GAC camper, was asked to write an ode directed towards something or someone she loved. Ruth chose to write about GAC. Here’s what she said..

G-A-C is the camp to beatRuth Wecker blanket
Really great people you will meet
Smelling the vanilla tree on the way to meals
Putting on chap stick so your lips don’t peel

 

Green and Gold, we represent
Spending two to four weeks in a big green tent
Without this camp my summers would be a bore
Missing out on sleeping with my cabin mates and listening to our counselors snore

 

Three years a banner, five years a blanket, ten years a jacket
I know I’m going to make it
Have fun, make friends, and grow is our motto
All the counselors have really cool names, like Ninja, Toyota and Pesto

 

Ruth Wecker
I come back every year to see my friends that I wish I were always near
Sailing in sunfishes
And sleeping under the stars making wishes
Just being at camp is a wish come true

 

There are always people to talk with and something to do
Everyone there is such a champ
I love and thank you, Gold Arrow Camp
(Wadda, Wadda, Wadda!)

What does camp mean to YOU?

Written By A Camper

friends

Gold Arrow Camp

By Madelyn, a 2014 Camper

I love Gold Arrow Camp.  I knew the minute I got on the bus for the very first time that I was going to learn a lot about myself, have a ton of fun and make lots of new friends.  That first summer, I went with one of my best friends and we stayed for one week.  It went by so fast and neither of us was ready for camp to end.  We spent our days paddle boarding, horse back riding, kayaking, rock climbing and swimming.  We spent our evenings around the campfire telling stories, making up songs and skits and eating s’mores… yumm.  The counselors were amazing and all had nicknames that made me laugh.  They were always there for us and kept us entertained and excited about camp life.

cabin campfire

The second summer I stayed for two weeks.  It was awesome!  I had even more fun (with theme days, a later bedtime and a special BINGO night) and got to go on more outdoor adventures.  My favorite was a 2-day camp-out on Shaver Island.  There, we slept under the stars and spent the days on the lake riding wake boards, water skis and knee boards.  We also did an overnight backpacking adventure where we cooked our meals over the campfire, explored a waterfall and swam in the lake.  I have so many great memories from that trip!

This summer will be my third summer and I can’t wait to see Sunshine, Monkey, Kona and Rascal and all my fellow campers.  It makes me so happy to think about camp.  I love GAC and can’t wait to get my three year banner!!

Originally published in Fast Forward magazine, March 2014 issue