Tag Archives: backpacking

Ep. 5 – Experiencing the Awe of Nature With Crater

Episode 5 of the Pog-Cast.

 

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On this episode of the Pog-Cast, Soy interviews Crater, who spent the summer of 2016 leading backpacking trips into the high country. They talk about the amazing nature of the High Sierra as well the impact that being in nature has on campers. As always, there’s a joke of the cast, WOWs and even a haiku from Croakie.

 

As always, you can send your WOWs to wow@goldarrowcamp.com, or hashtag #gacwow on Instagram or twitter. You can subscribe to the GAC Pog-Cast on iTunes here.

Learning about our Trees

Vanilla Tree

Smelling our favorite tree, The Vanilla Tree!

In our expanded Nature program this summer, we’re learning to identify the five most common trees we have in camp – Jeffrey Pine, White Fir, Red Fir, Lodgepole Pine, and Sierra Juniper.

Camp Director Alison “Bean” Moeschberger worked with Welker’s Tree Nursery to get some saplings of those varieties and also some Giant Sequoias (state tree of CA).

The tree activity involves learning to identifying trees by looking at bark, pine needles, and cones,finding pine cones and seeds, and measuring the circumference of the Jeffrey Pines in order to estimate their age.

We have one tree in camp that is estimated to be 440 years old!IMG_7319

In addition to learning to identify trees, we’ve also partnered with the Center for Outdoor Ethics to pilot a Leave No Trace curriculum for camps. At our OREO (hiking), Nature, and Backpacking programs this summer, campers are learning the philosophy of Leave No Trace and learning how to implement it as good stewards of our environment!

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Every Kid in a Park

BP-C00-1330All of our 4th grade campers recently received a special envelope in the mail from GAC. As part of the National Park Foundation’s Open OutDoors for Kids program, the White House and the Federal Land Management agencies partnered together to launch the Every Kid in a Park initiative.

With shrinking school funding for field trips, this program seeks to remove the barriers for kids to access our nation’s public lands and waters. Every 4th grade student in the country is eligible to receive a pass that allows for free access to experience federal lands andBP-C18-1066 waters during the 2015-2016 school year. As educators and advocates for the outdoors, Gold Arrow Camp obtained passes for all of our 4th grade campers and mailed them earlier this month. We hope that all of our camp families will utilize public lands, and we think this free pass is a great way to start that conversation in our camp community! We would love to see pictures of our GAC campers and families spending time together outdoors. Send us a picture to feature on our website.

Did you know that Gold Arrow Camp is located near three great National Parks? Any camp family planning to drop off or pick up campers from camp this summer can plan a detour through one of these stunning national treasures.

Make it a priority for your family to enjoy the outdoors together!

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Learn more about Yosemite National Park, Sequoia National Park, and Kings Canyon National Park.

Ten Most Memorable Moments of GAC 2014

1. New Programs!

This summer, GAC added FOUR new programs: Log Rolling, Hammock Hangout, GACting, and Ice Cream Making.

 

2. Big Campfire – Bigger and Better Than Ever!

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Big Campfire featured new seating, a sound booth, and a staging area behind the stage. Campers now have the opportunity to prepare for skits backstage!

 

3. Appreciation Campfire Highlight Videos

At the end of each Appreciation Campfire, before counselors lit candles and we all sang “The Circle Game,” we watched a video of session highlights produced by Curly, our videographer. There were even guest vocals by counselors.

 

4. Campers Conquered Fears

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At the end of the summer, this banner was filled with stories and signatures of campers who conquered their fear of sailing!

 

5. Koo Koo Kanga Roo

Many times during the summer, campers and staff would drop everything to pick up our feet and stomp them to a Koo Koo Kanga Roo hit.

 

6. ChiLala Got Married (Again!)

ChiLala Wedding

Veteran GAC counselors, Chilli and Lala (ChiLala), got married in Maryland in May, 2014. They returned to their GAC home for a week this summer. While at camp, they finally had a proper GAC wedding, including a paper tie made in Arts and Crafts and a bubble arch from campers as they entered their reception, a Wedding Banquet on the Dining Porch, with all Session #3 campers and counselors invited!

 

7. Outdoor Leadership Course

In its sophomore year, the OLC took older campers on a challenging seven day, 30+ mile backpacking trip that included a High Sierra crossing of the John Muir Wilderness.

 

8. We Danced…. A Lot!

June Sports DanceSession 1 Animal DanceSession 2 Neon Dance Session 3 Superhero DanceSession 4 Historical Figure DanceAugust Western Dance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2014 Dance Themes were a hit this summer!

  • June Water Sports Specialty Camp: Sports
  • Session 1: Animal
  • Session 2: Neon
  • Session 3: Superhero
  • Session 4: Historical Figure
  • August Shaver Water Sports and Mini Camp: Western

9. Shaver Island

Shaver Island, GAC’s outpost island on Shaver Lake, continued to be a highlight for many campers. Campers visit the island for 1-2 nights during a two-week session, sleeping on the beach under the stars each night, and focusing on waterskiing, wakeboarding, and kneeboarding, riding on competition-style ski boats. Oh, and s’mores, camp songs and games around a campfire circle were included each night!

 

10. We HAD FUN, MADE FRIENDS, AND GREW!

Is there any other way to spend a summer?

 

Thanks to all our amazing campers and counselors who joined us in 2014!

See you next summer!

Nature Pees and Lanyard Fishing Poles

Written by: Audrey “Sunshine” Monke, Camp Director at Gold Arrow Camp.

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Watching the campers construct fishing poles out of sticks and lanyard string, I had a revelation.  Kids rarely get a chance to play like this any more.   And, boy, are they good at it when they are given the opportunity!

For the first time in many years, I went on a GAC backpacking trip last summer. Led by experienced and fun backpacking instructors, Cabin 0 and I enjoyed a fun-filled afternoon and overnight at Indian Falls before returning to camp the following morning.

Nature Pees During the hike, we sang songs, did riddles, and talked as we walked. We took a break to play “Camouflage” at Indian Pools. One camper stood in a designated spot while the rest of us hid in the surrounding area. We had to be able to see the “Spotter,” who carefully looked around at the surrounding rocks, trees, and bushes to try to spot us. We drank our water and ate our special camp trail mix – a homemade concoction of granola and LOTS of chocolate. Since it was warm, our chocolate melted, making a gooey, cookie-like substance that tasted much better out on a trail than it ever would at home.

When we reached our destination, we weren’t overly tired (it’s about a two and a half mile trip), but we were hot and ready to go in the water. In the pool below Indian Falls, the kids swam, played in the waterfall, and explored. Three hours passed while the girls entertained themselves playing in and around the water. When the group counselor brought down lanyard string, several of the girls made fishing poles. I was struck by how naturally creative kids are when left to their own devices.  And I was so thankful that our campers have the opportunity to just play, without adults providing all of the structure, all of the time.

I was also thankful that our children get to spend a night in an even more remote and natural setting than camp. Several of the girls were experienced GAC campers who were well versed in “nature peeing,” which is what is required when you’re out in the wilderness without toilets of any kind. One first-year camper proudly declared at campfire that she had done her first “nature pee.”  I thought about how many kids (and people) don’t want to spend a night in the wilderness, because they can’t bear the thought of being without the comforts of home. These girls absolutely loved being there and felt a tremendous sense of accomplishment at carrying their belongings and learning to live outdoors. I know they are developing a love of the outdoors and am so glad they had the opportunity to backpack at Gold Arrow Camp.
Backpacking

Our dinner was grilled cheese and pesto sandwiches (pesto optional) and tasted delicious. Everything tastes better cooked over a campfire! We ate through two loaves of bread before we moved on to s’mores and a cookie concoction that was slightly charred on the outside but gooey and delicious on the inside.

The girls shared their highs and lows of the day around the campfire before we brushed our teeth using our water bottles and climbed into our sleeping bags to enjoy the night sky. I woke up several times and never quite found a comfortable position on the hard dirt, but the stars provided a great backdrop to a restless night of sleep. The campers, however, all declared in the morning how well they slept. Ah, the miracle of childhood!

We returned to camp with dirty faces, hands, and clothes, but we felt fantastic and had an experience all of us will remember forever.

Richard Louv’s Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder is a great book about the importance of getting our kids out in nature. 

Let’s get our kids unplugged and show them how amazing, beautiful, and fun it is to be outside!

Written By A Camper

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Gold Arrow Camp

By Madelyn, a 2014 Camper

I love Gold Arrow Camp.  I knew the minute I got on the bus for the very first time that I was going to learn a lot about myself, have a ton of fun and make lots of new friends.  That first summer, I went with one of my best friends and we stayed for one week.  It went by so fast and neither of us was ready for camp to end.  We spent our days paddle boarding, horse back riding, kayaking, rock climbing and swimming.  We spent our evenings around the campfire telling stories, making up songs and skits and eating s’mores… yumm.  The counselors were amazing and all had nicknames that made me laugh.  They were always there for us and kept us entertained and excited about camp life.

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The second summer I stayed for two weeks.  It was awesome!  I had even more fun (with theme days, a later bedtime and a special BINGO night) and got to go on more outdoor adventures.  My favorite was a 2-day camp-out on Shaver Island.  There, we slept under the stars and spent the days on the lake riding wake boards, water skis and knee boards.  We also did an overnight backpacking adventure where we cooked our meals over the campfire, explored a waterfall and swam in the lake.  I have so many great memories from that trip!

This summer will be my third summer and I can’t wait to see Sunshine, Monkey, Kona and Rascal and all my fellow campers.  It makes me so happy to think about camp.  I love GAC and can’t wait to get my three year banner!!

Originally published in Fast Forward magazine, March 2014 issue